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  • Evita Ellis

CAREERS: Librarian

Updated: Jul 8, 2019


Librarians typically do the following:


· Help library patrons conduct research and find the information they need

· Teach classes about information resources

· Help patrons evaluate search results and reference materials

· Organize library materials so they are easy to find, and maintain collections

· Plan programs for different audiences, such as storytelling for young children

· Develop and use databases of library materials

· Research new books and materials by reading book reviews, publishers’ announcements,

and catalogs

· Choose new books, audio books, videos, and other materials for the library

· Research and buy new computers and other equipment as needed for the library

· Train and direct library technicians, assistants, other support staff, and volunteers

· Prepare library budgets


In small libraries, librarians are often responsible for many or all aspects of library operations. They may manage a staff of library assistants and technicians. In larger libraries, they usually focus on one aspect of library work, including user services, technical services, or administrative services.


The following are examples of types of librarians:


User services librarians help patrons conduct research using both electronic and print resources. They teach patrons how to use library resources to find information on their own. This may include familiarizing patrons with catalogs of print materials, helping them access and search digital libraries, or educating them on Internet search techniques. Some user services librarians work with a particular audience, such as children or young adults.


Technical services librarians obtain, prepare, and organize print and electronic library materials. They arrange materials to make sources easy for patrons to find information. They are also responsible for ordering new library materials and archiving to preserve older items.


Administrative services librarians manage libraries, hire and supervise staff, prepare budgets, and negotiate contracts for library materials and equipment. Some conduct public relations or fundraising for the library.


Academic librarians assist students, faculty, and staff in post-secondary institutions. They help students research topics related to their coursework and teach students how to access information. They also assist faculty and staff in locating resources related to their research projects or studies. Some campuses have multiple libraries, and librarians may specialize in a particular subject.


Public librarians work in their communities to serve all members of the public. They help patrons find books to read for pleasure; conduct research for schoolwork, business, or personal interest; and learn how to access the library’s resources. Many public librarians plan programs for patrons, such as story time for children, book clubs, or other educational activities.


School librarians, sometimes called school media specialists, work in elementary, middle, and high school libraries, and teach students how to use library resources. They also help teachers develop lesson plans and find materials for classroom instruction.


Special librarians work in settings other than school or public libraries. They are sometimes called information professionals. Law firms, hospitals, businesses, museums, government agencies, and many other groups have their own libraries that use special librarians. The main purpose of these libraries and information centers is to serve the information needs of the organization that houses the library. Therefore, special librarians collect and organize materials focused on those subjects. Special librarians may need an additional degree in the subject that they specialize in.


The following are examples of special librarians:


Corporate librarians assist employees in private businesses in conducting research and finding information. They work for a wide range of businesses, including insurance companies, consulting firms, and publishers.


Government librarians provide research services and access to information for government staff and the public.


Law librarians help lawyers, law students, judges, and law clerks locate and organize legal resources. They often work in law firms and law school libraries.


Medical librarians, also called health science librarians, help health professionals, patients, and researchers find health and science information. They may provide information about new clinical trials and medical treatments and procedures, teach medical students how to locate medical information, or answer consumers’ health questions.


Source - https://www.bls.gov/ooh/education-training-and-library/librarians.htm#tab-2

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