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  • Evita Ellis

CAREERS: Environmental Scientists and Specialists

Updated: Jul 8, 2019


Environmental scientists and specialists typically do the following:


· Determine data collection methods for research projects, investigations, and surveys

· Collect and compile environmental data from samples of air, soil, water, food, and other

materials for scientific analysis

· Analyze samples, surveys, and other information to identify and assess threats to the

environment

· Develop plans to prevent, control, or fix environmental problems, such as land or water

pollution

· Provide information and guidance to government officials, businesses, and the general

public on possible environmental hazards and health risks

· Prepare technical reports and presentations that explain their research and findings


Environmental scientists and specialists analyze environmental problems and develop solutions to them. For example, many environmental scientists and specialists work to reclaim lands and waters that have been contaminated by pollution. Others assess the risks that new construction projects pose to the environment and make recommendations to governments and businesses on how to minimize the environmental impact of these projects. Environmental scientists and specialists may do research and provide advice on manufacturing practices, such as advising against the use of chemicals that are known to harm the environment.


The federal government and many state and local governments have regulations to ensure that there is clean air to breathe and safe water to drink, and that there are no hazardous materials in the soil. The regulations also place limits on development, particularly near sensitive ecosystems, such as wetlands. Environmental scientists and specialists who work for governments ensure that the regulations are followed. Other environmental scientists and specialists work for consulting firms that help companies comply with regulations and policies.


Some environmental scientists and specialists focus on environmental regulations that are designed to protect people’s health, while others focus on regulations designed to minimize society’s impact on the ecosystem.


The following are examples of types of specialists:


Climate change analysts study effects on ecosystems caused by the changing climate. They may do outreach education activities and grant writing typical of scientists.


Environmental health and safety specialists study how environmental factors affect human health. They investigate potential environmental health risks. For example, they may investigate and address issues arising from soil and water contamination caused by nuclear weapons manufacturing. They also educate the public about health risks that may be present in the environment.


Environmental restoration planners assess polluted sites and determine the cost and activities necessary to clean up the area.


Industrial ecologists work with industry to increase the efficiency of their operations and thereby limit the impacts these activities have on the environment. They analyze costs and benefits of various programs, as well as their impacts on ecosystems.


Other environmental scientists and specialists perform work and receive training similar to that of other physical or life scientists, but they focus on environmental issues.


For example, environmental chemists study the effects that various chemicals have on ecosystems. To illustrate, they may study how acids affect plants, animals, and people. Some areas in which they work include waste management and the remediation of contaminated soils, water, and air.


Many people with backgrounds in environmental science become postsecondary teachers or high school teachers.


Source - https://www.bls.gov/ooh/life-physical-and-social-science/environmental-scientists-and-specialists.htm#tab-2

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